Foot Doctor Blog

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We would like to announce that Dr. Royden J. Stanford, DPM has successfully achieved Board Certification by the American Board of Podiatric Medicine, and is now a Diplomate of the ABPM.

Dr. Stanford is commited to providing the foremost foot and ankle care to his patients. This is acheived through continuing his education in advancements in Podiatry and Foot Surgery. We are excited for the benefits of board certification that will be passed on to our patients.

To learn more about Dr. Stanford read his profile here.

People with diabetes are more prone to foot problems – ever wondered why?

This is largely due to high fluctuations in blood glucose levels that cause damage to blood vessels and lead to lower limb circulatory problems. Another significant impact on the disease is on the skin that becomes more susceptible to infections especially of the lower limb, including bacterial and fungal infections. Nerve damage and poor blood flow to the feet increases the risk of various foot complications. Left untreated, cuts and blisters can become serious infections and take much longer than usual to heal.

New research shows that a diabetic’s skin on the feet should not be occluded, as the lack of transpiration may cause the skin to break down, leaving the skin of the foot at risk of not performing its function of protection. All Footlogix products are non-occlusive, taking special care to not seal or impede the natural functions of the skin.

For more on Footlogix products: http://www.footlogix.com/a-solution-to-dry-cracked-heels/

We now carry some Footlogix Products for purchase in the clinic. Come in and check them out!

Feels like a pebble is in your shoe? You might have a foot condition called Morton's Neuroma...

Morton's Neuroma (Intermetatarsal Neuroma)

What Is a Neuroma? 

A neuroma is a thickening of nerve tissue that may develop in various parts of the body. The most common neuroma in the foot is a Morton’s neuroma, which occurs between the third and fourth toes. It is sometimes referred to as an intermetatarsal neuroma. Intermetatarsal describes its location in the ball of the foot between the metatarsal bones. Neuromas may also occur in other locations in the foot.

The thickening of the nerve that defines a neuroma is the result of compression and irritation of the nerve. This compression creates enlargement of the nerve, eventually leading to permanent nerve damage.

Morton's Neuroma

Causes

Anything that causes compression or irritation of the nerve can lead to the development of a neuroma. One of the most common offenders is wearing shoes that have a tapered toe box or high-heeled shoes that cause the toes to be forced into the toe box. People with certain foot deformities—bunions, hammertoes, flatfeet or more flexible feet—are at higher risk for developing a neuroma. Other potential causes are activities that involve repetitive irritation to the ball of the foot, such as running or court sports. An injury or other type of trauma to the area may also lead to a neuroma.

Click here to read the full article:

https://www.foothealthfacts.org/conditions/morton-s-neuroma-(intermetatarsal-neuroma)

Protecting Ankles, Feet From Winter's Assaults

Proper footwear a must, especially for people with nerve damage or extreme sensitivity to cold, foot surgeon says

HealthDay news image

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 11, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- From broken bones to frostbite, you're at extra risk for foot and ankle injuries during winter. But you can protect yourself, according to a surgeon who specializes in podiatry.

"During the winter months, patients should take extra precaution to keep their feet warm and dry when navigating frigid temps, especially patients who have existing health conditions," said Dr. Greg Catalano, a Massachusetts-based foot and ankle surgeon.

The first step is to wear proper footwear, he said.

"Whether caused by wearing high heels on icy surfaces or just sheer accident, falls are one of the most common causes of weather-related injuries. Oftentime, wintertime falls result in an ankle sprain, or worse, a broken bone in the foot, ankle, heel or toe. I encourage patients to wear low-heeled shoes or boots with a traction sole to help prevent slipping," Catalano said...

For the full article click on the link below:

https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163000.html