Foot Doctor Blog

Posts for tag: Sports Injuries

"Board tricks, repeated foot impact can lead to serious injury."

As school programs draw to a close and youth head outside for more physical activity, Podiatrists see a rise in foot injuries from a variety of summer activities. Consider skateboarding. Dr. Stanford, DPM, says "Parents should be on the look out for more than just bad bruising and ankle sprains." "Don't hesitate to seek a proper medical evaluation on any injury since more can be going on below the surface of the skin."

Here is an article highlighting the potential risks associated with skateboarding (Full article from foothealthfacts.org)

Children and young adults love the thrill of skateboarding. They learn to master their skills of "riding the rail" and "catching air." But according to the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS), such tricks, while fun, can be physically demanding and can cause serious foot and ankle injuries.

Foot and ankle surgeons around the country warn they continue to see serious lower-extremity skateboard injuries among their patients. These injuries range from minor bruises to open wounds or cuts to more serious foot and ankle sprains and fractures, which may require surgical repair.

Virginia-based foot and ankle surgeon, Jennifer Purvis, DPM, FACFAS, advises skateboarders to use caution and to wear protective gear, including properly supportive shoes, when skateboarding. "Skateboarding can be particularly hard on your feet and ankles because of the impact caused when performing jumps and tricks," Dr. Purvis explains. "Skateboarders should be aware that the strain from repetitive, forceful motions can also cause painful foot and heel conditions, such as plantar fasciitis, bone spurs, fractures (traumatic or stress) and Achilles tendonitis, which may require more intensive, longer-term therapies," she said.

Even minor cuts or abrasions on your feet can cause serious problems. Dr. Purvis recently treated a 21-year-old skateboarder for scrapes on his feet and ankles that were not healing. Tests indicated he had contracted MRSA, a very serious and sometimes deadly staph infection, which required surgery and four weeks of antibiotic therapy.

Foot and ankle sprains and fractures are common skateboarding injuries. Karl Collins, DPM, FACFAS, who practices in St. Louis, stresses the importance of seeing a foot and ankle surgeon to ensure proper diagnosis and course of treatment for these injuries. Until you can be seen by a doctor, it is best to take a break from activities and use RICE therapy (Rest, Ice, Compression and Elevation), which helps reduce pain and control swelling around the injury. 

"A common misconception about foot and ankle fractures is that if you can walk on the foot, there isn't a fracture," Dr. Collins said. "That's not always the case, and only a proper diagnosis can rule out a serious injury requiring an advanced treatment plan."

Heel pain in children is often due to an injury to the growth plate, a condition called “Calcaneal Apophysitis” or otherwise known as “Sever’s Disease”. Overuse or repeated stress to the growth plate results in painful inflammation. This type of heel pain appears different for children than adults and does not go away easily. There are a few treatments offered at our clinic for this painful condition.

Calcaneal278

Click here to read more about Calcaneal Apophysitis

Click here to read about our Custom Orthotics

Come have our pediatric specialist, Dr. Stanford, DPM evaluate and treat your child’s heel pain today!

Back-to-School Soccer Season: Prime time for foot and ankle injuries. 

(Article from foothealthfacts.org)

Parents and coaches should think twice before coaxing young, injury-prone soccer players to "play through" foot and ankle pain, according to the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons.

"Skeletally immature kids, starting and stopping and moving side to side on cleats that are little more than moccasins with spikes—that’s a recipe for foot and ankle sprains and worse," cautions Christopher Hendrix, DPM, FACFAS, a Memphis, Tennessee foot and ankle surgeon.

"Kids will play with lingering, nagging heel pain that, upon testing, turns out to be a stress fracture that neither they, their parents nor their coaches were aware of," he said. "By playing with pain, they can’t give their team 100 percent and can make their injuries worse, which prolongs their time out of soccer."

Hendrix said he has actually needed to show parents x-rays of fractures before they will take their kids out of the game. "And stress fractures can be subtle—they don’t always show up on initial x-rays."

Stress Fractures, Achilles Tendonitis, Heel Pain, Ankle Sprains, Broken Toes

Symptoms of stress fractures include pain during normal activity and when touching the area and swelling without bruising. Treatment usually involves rest and sometimes casting. Some stress fractures heal poorly and often require surgery, such as a break in the elongated bone near the little toe, known as a Jones fracture.

Constant running in socer can place excessive stress on the foot. Pain from overuse usually stems from inflammation, such as around the growth plate of the heel bone, more so than a stress fracture, according to Hendrix.Girl playing soccer

"Their growth plates are still open, and bones are still growing and maturing—until they’re about 13 to 16. Rest and, in some cases, immobilization of the foot should relieve that inflammation," he said.

Hendrix added that Achilles tendonitis and plantar fasciitis (heel pain caused by inflammation of the tissue extending from the heel to the toes) are other types of overuse injuries.

Quick, out-of-nowhere ankle sprains are also common in soccer.

"Ankle sprains should be evaluated by a foot and ankle surgeon to assess the extent of the injury," said Hendrix. "If the ankle stays swollen for days and is painful to walk on or even stand on, it could be a fracture," Hendrix said.

Collisions between soccer players take their toll on toes.

"When two feet are coming at the ball simultaneously, that ball turns into a cement block and goes nowhere. The weakest point in that transaction is usually a foot, with broken toes the outcome," he explained. "The toes swell up so much the player can't get a shoe on, which is a good sign for young athletes and their parents. If they are having trouble just getting a shoe on, they shouldn't play."

Treat Injuries Immediately

If you think your child has suffered any sort of foot or ankle soccer injury, call Aurora Foot and Ankle Clinic to schedule an appointment with Dr. Stanford, DPM. He is board certified by the American Board of Podiatric Medicine and a member of the American College of Foot & Ankle Pediatrics.

 

Six Tips to Protect Kids in Fall Sports

Article from foothealthfacts.org

Every fall season, foot and ankle surgeons see an increase in ankle injuries among young athletes. Football, soccer and basketball are the sports most likely to lead to sprains, broken bones and other problems.

If your children are playing sports this fall, here are six tips that could protect them from serious ankle injuries:

  1. Get ankle injuries treated right away. What seems like a sprain is not always a sprain; in addition to cartilage injuries, your son or daughter might have injured other bones in the foot without knowing it. Have a qualified doctor examine the injury. The sooner rehabilitation starts, the sooner long-term problems like instability or arthritis can be prevented and the sooner your child can get back into competition.
     
  2. Have old sprains checked by a doctor before the season starts. A medical checkup can reveal whether your child's previously injured ankle might be vulnerable to sprains and could possibly benefit from wearing a supportive ankle brace during competition.
     
  3. Buy the right shoe for the sport. Different sports require different shoe gear. Players should not mix baseball cleats with football shoes.
     
  4. Children should start the season with new shoes. Old shoes can wear down like a car tire and become uneven on the bottom, causing the ankle to tilt because the foot cannot lie flat.
  5. Check playing fields for dips, divots and holes. Most sports-related ankle sprains are caused by jumping and running on uneven surfaces. That is why some surgeons recommend that parents walk the field, especially when children compete in nonprofessional settings like public parks, for spots that could catch a player's foot and throw them to the ground. Alert coaching officials to any irregularities.
     
  6. Encourage stretching and warmup exercises. Calf stretches and light jogging before competition help warm up ligaments and blood vessels, reducing the risk for ankle injuries.

At Aurora Foot and Ankle Clinic, Dr. Stanford treats many athletic patients. He performs a thorough exam and assessment and offers an extensive course of treatment to get that athlete back to playing on and off the field.

We also specialize in prescription custom orthotics that can be fabricated specifically for running shoes, cleats and skates. Read more on our Orthotics page.

By Aurora Foot & Ankle Clinic
January 07, 2016
Category: Sports Medicine

If you play sports, sooner or later you are probably going to have an injury.

It’s the nature of the beast – sports activities require strenuous physical activities and movements, from more natural activities such as walking, running or jumping to a range of motion activities.Sports Injuries

It’s important to understand the nature of your injury and what you need to do to alleviate it. The staff of Aurora Foot and Ankle Clinic stand ready to help those in the Langley or Barnaby, British Columbia area when they experience a sports injury.

There are basically two types of injuries, acute and chronic. Acute injuries occur while the athlete is engaged in his or her sport. Examples of acute injuries include but are not limited to sprains, strains, and fractures. Chronic injuries are conditions caused or exacerbated by athletic activity and generally manifest either during exercise or after one is finished performing the activity. Signs of chronic injury include but are not limited to pain during exercise, a dull ache while at rest, and swelling.

If you are injured and you feel any of the following signs or symptoms, you should seek treatment:

  • Severe pain, swelling, or numbness
  • Inability to put weight on the injured area
  • Aches, pains, or swelling from an old injury
  • A joint feels unstable or abnormal

However, not all injuries require medical attention; indeed many injuries can be treated at home. If you do not have any symptoms such as described above, you can start treating the injury using the RICE (Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation) method. Follow these four steps for at least 48 hours after you experience an injury.

  • Rest – Rest and protect the sore or injured area.
  • Ice – Apply an ice or cold pack for 10-20 minutes at least three times a day. Do not apply the ice directly to the skin.
  • Compression – wrap the injured area – but not too tightly -- with an elastic bandage
  • Elevate – elevate the injured area whenever you are resting or whenever you are icing the injury.

If the pain persists or little to no improvement occurs, it will probably be necessary to see a doctor. One point is generally agreed upon, however: It is never a good idea to try to “tough it out” or play through pain; you should always stop exercise when you feel pain and you should always deal with the injury immediately.

For more information or to setup an appointment call 604-248-8985.